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Our Feature Projects explores the most thought-provoking builds we have collaborated on. They offer behind-the-scenes insights from the creatives responsible for the project’s conception, illustrating how we can work with our clients to create a bespoke impression.

In 2019 we published a range of projects from expansive estates and luxury beach houses to inner-city contemporary retreats that showcase our natural stone range and outdoor furniture collection.

Here, we take a look back at some of the most popular Feature Projects published in 2019.

Oak House by Kennedy Nolan

Kennedy Nolan Oak House

For many architects, alterations and additions are the firm’s bread and butter. For Kennedy Nolan, this is no different. “Like so many practices, these projects have become a testing ground for our architectural ideas,” says director of architecture, Victoria Reeves.

The adaptive re-use of the double-fronted Victorian comprised of a relatively conventional brief: making the domestic environment functional and dignified.

Architecture: Kennedy Nolan
Landscape Design: Amanda Oliver Gardens
Photography: Derek Swalwell

View the Oak House feature here.

Cove House by Justin Humphrey Architect

Cove House Justin Humphrey

An easement planning restriction is often perceived as a constraint, dictating the site layout and architectural form. The design of Cove House attempted to prove the opposite; to challenge the benign response to the water-access easement typical of the Sanctuary Cove area by embracing the home’s boundaries and external context.

Justin Humphrey Architect viewed the easement spanning the property’s eastern perimeter as an opportunity to make a visual statement and foster a connection with the broader community.

Architecture: Justin Humphrey Architect
Photography: Andy Macpherson

View the Cove House feature here.

Residence 950

Residence 950 Troon Pacific

Six years in the making, Residence 950 was designed with the most discerning homeowner in mind. Its “a virtual oasis in the heart of the city,” says Gregory Malin, CEO of real estate development firm Troon Pacific.

The expansive urban estate perched atop a tree-lined slope in San Francisco’s thriving Russian Hill neighbourhood delivers uncompromised living with jaw-dropping panoramic views and blends classic San Francisco architecture with modern luxury.

Architecture: Troon Pacific
Photography: David Livingston, Paul Dyer, Steel Blue, Jacob Elliott

View the Residence 950 feature here.

Portsea Beach House

Studio Esteta Portsea Beach House

Located in an enviable position within arm’s reach of the Portsea Pier, the refurbishment of Portsea Beach House references the home’s coastal context and pays homage to it’s mid-century bones. “Our client’s brief sought to rejuvenate the double-storey residence, whilst maintaining the existing building footprint”, explains Sarah Cosentino, director of Studio Esteta.

As the orientation of the original dwelling already maximised the coastal aspect, the client engaged Studio Esteta to tailor the spatial arrangement to better accommodate their love for entertaining with minor modifications.

Architecture & Interiors: Studio Esteta
Photography: Sean Fennessy

View the Portsea Beach House feature here.

Dizzy Heights

Bruce Stafford Dizzy Heights

The exposed clifftop position and expansive sea views made for a desirable property for its new ocean-loving owners. However, the spatial layout of the existing dwelling neglected to meet their needs and the surrounding landscape was tired with dilapidated features.

Architect Bruce Stafford explains the initial site visit revealed the home’s poor circulation with inaccessible tight, dark interiors. However, the unique setting and existing architectural elements offered the opportunity to create a remarkable home perched on the cliff.

Architecture: Bruce Stafford Architects
Interior Design: Hare + Klein
Landscape Design: Secret Gardens
Photography: Jen Wilding + Michael Nicolson

View the Dizzy Heights feature here.

Pavillion House

Pavilion House by Robson Rak

When Melbourne architecture and interior design practice Robson Rak were engaged to restore and extend an 1880’s Victorian home they knew they had a challenge on their hands.

The brief called for modernisation of the original interiors to improve functionality, while extending the footprint with a substantial addition to accommodate future growth, explains interior architect Chris Rak. On top of the need for added square footage, the client sought to blend together the distinct Victorian architecture with a mid-century modernist aesthetic they’d come to love after spending time in Los Angeles.

“Initially the brief was challenging,” says Chris. “But it all fell into place with our use of linking landscapes via internal courtyards and the strategic use of certain materials.”

Architecture: Robson Rak
Landscape Design: Mud Office
Photography: Shannon McGrath

View the Pavilion House feature here.